Working as a Registered Nurse. Understanding their impact

January 16, 2023 at 2:20 PM

A registered nurse (RN) is a licensed healthcare professional who provides patient care, education, and emotional support. They may perform tasks such as taking vital signs, administering medication, and working with physicians to develop treatment plans.

RNs also educate patients and their families about health conditions and may supervise licensed practical nurses and nursing assistants. They often work in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and other healthcare settings.


 

A closer look at the registered nurse job description

A registered nurse performs a variety of tasks to provide patient care, education, and emotional support. Some of the specific responsibilities of an RN may include:

• Assessing patients' health status and needs
• Developing and implementing patient care plans
• Administering medication and treatments
• Monitoring patients' progress and responses to treatment
• Communicating with physicians and other healthcare professionals to provide patient care coordination
• Educating patients and their families about health conditions and treatment options
• Supervising licensed practical nurses and nursing assistants
• Keeping detailed records of patients' health information and care plans
• Maintaining a clean and safe environment for patients
• Participating in continuing education and professional development opportunities to stay current with advances in nursing practice and patient care

RNs often work in a variety of healthcare settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and private homes. They may also work in specialty areas such as pediatrics, oncology, or emergency care.


 

What's the difference between a registered nurse and a certified nursing assistant?

A registered nurse (RN) and a certified nursing assistant (CNA) are both healthcare professionals, but they have different levels of education, training, and responsibilities.

A registered nurse is a licensed healthcare professional who has completed a degree program in nursing, such as an associate degree in nursing (ADN) or a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN). RNs are responsible for providing patient care, education, and emotional support.

They may perform tasks such as taking vital signs, administering medication, and working with physicians to develop treatment plans. They also educate patients and their families about health conditions and may supervise licensed practical nurses and nursing assistants.

A certified nursing assistant (CNA) is a trained healthcare worker who typically works under the supervision of an RN or a licensed practical nurse (LPN). CNAs are responsible for providing basic patient care, such as helping patients with activities of daily living (ADLs) such as bathing, dressing, and eating.

They also take vital signs and assist patients with mobility. They typically work in long-term care facilities, hospitals, and home healthcare settings. They need to pass a state competency exam and it is less education required compared to RN.

In summary, RNs are responsible for providing a wide range of patient care and have more education and training than CNAs, who typically provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs or LPNs.


 

Is becoming a registered nurse worth it?

Becoming a registered nurse can be a rewarding career choice, as it offers the opportunity to make a positive impact on the lives of patients and their families.

RNs are in high demand, and the job outlook for nursing is positive, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics projecting that employment of RNs will grow much faster than the average for all occupations through 2029.

However, becoming an RN requires a significant investment of time and money. RNs typically need to complete an associate degree in nursing (ADN) or a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), which can take two to four years to complete. Additionally, RNs must pass a national licensing exam, known as the NCLEX-RN, in order to practice as licensed RN.

In terms of earning potential, RNs generally earn more than CNAs, and the median annual salary for RNs in the United States is about $75,000. However, the earning potential for RNs can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the type of employer, location, and level of education and experience.

Overall, becoming an RN can be a worthwhile investment, but it's important to carefully consider your career goals and the time and financial commitment required before making a decision. It's also worth researching and reaching out to RNs to get a feel of the job, the daily tasks and the work-life balance.

by Tarta.ai